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Amber Heard files for divorce from Johnny Depp: media

Actress Amber Heard has filed for divorce from husband Johnny Depp after just 15 months of marriage, several media outlets reported on Wednesday.Heard, 30, filed the divorce petition in a Los Angeles court on Monday, citing "irreconcilable differences" with the 52-year-old Depp, the A-list actor who starred in "Pirates of the Caribbean," according to a copy of the court documents uploaded online by celebrity news website TMZ.Reuters could not independently verify the report. Representatives for the two did not return calls or emails seeking comment.The couple got married in February of last year after meeting when they appeared together in the 2011 film "The Rum Diary."The pair began dating after Depp split from his longtime partner, French actress Vanessa Paradis. Depp and Paradis are the parents of two teenage children, a boy and a girl. Depp and Heard made global headlines last year when they ran into legal trouble for bringing their Yorkshire terriers, Pistol and Boo, into Australia as Depp was filming the latest "Pirates of the Caribbean" movie, breaching the country's tight biosecurity laws.Heard was charged with two counts of illegally importing the pets and one count of producing a false document last July. A magistrate judge in April filed no conviction for Heard but issued a formal order to stay out of trouble for a month or face a A$1,000 ($767) fine. A videoed deadpan apology by Depp and Heard for the offense, gleefully dubbed the "war on terrier" and "terriergate" by the Australian media, later went viral.Depp gained fame in the late 1980s after appearing in the popular TV series "21 Jump Street" and later starred in "Edward Scissorhands" and "Alice in Wonderland." Depp stars in the sequel, "Alice Through the Looking Glass," released in theaters on Friday. Heard most recently appeared in the film "The Danish Girl." (Reporting by Curtis Skinner in San Francisco)

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Museum shines rare spotlight on China's Cultural Revolution

CHENGDU, China Tucked away in southwestern China's Sichuan province, a private collector stands virtually alone in exhibiting relics from the 1966-1976 Cultural Revolution.Monday marks the 50th anniversary of the start of the political movement, with no official commemorations planned. Official records whitewash the details of both periods, but admit that Mao made major mistakes. The 1958-1961 Great Leap Forward, when millions starved to death in late chairman Mao Zedong's botched industrialization campaign, and the Cultural Revolution are two of modern China's most sensitive historical events.Fan Jianchuan, who opened his Jianchuan Museum Cluster to the public in 2005, said his relics, which refer discreetly to a "Red era", were beneficial to the nation."I have a saying: We don't speak. Let the cultural relics talk," Fan told Reuters TV. "Our nation's cultural treasures need to be inherited ... but it is more important to pass on the nation's experience and some lessons. That's why I have stayed with this cause for decades." During the Cultural Revolution, children turned on parents and students on teachers after Mao declared class war, convulsing the country in chaos and violence. The upheaval affected industry as well, including the critical steel sector.From 1967 to the end of 1968, thousands of steel mills were occupied and closed down, slashing steel output. China's cabinet, or the State Council, was forced to step in, ordering steel enterprises to cease the "struggle" and restore output. While recent years have seen increased public discussion of both events, certain topics remain almost completely off limits, including the death of Lin Biao, once handpicked to succeed Mao but killed in a mysterious plane crash in 1971 while fleeing China having been accused of plotting a coup.Students who toured the museum in a suburb of the provincial capital Chengdu, listened carefully as their guide explained a period in China's history that is largely missing in their textbooks. Luo Qingsong, one of the students from Sichuan Management Professional Institute, said the Cultural Revolution could not happen again in China today."I think modern China is an open country and integrated into the world. I believe our party, the country and our leadership would not adopt such policies again," Luo said. (Editing by Patrick Johnston and Stephen Coates)

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China tech workers asleep on the job - with the boss's blessing

BEIJING Dai Xiang has slept his way to the top.The 40-year-old Beijinger got his start as an engineer, pulling 72-hour shifts at a machinery company while catching naps on the floor. After a switch to the tech industry and around 15 years of catching naps on desks and other flat surfaces, Dai co-founded his own cloud computing firm, BaishanCloud, last year. One of his first orders of business - installing 12 bunk beds in a secluded corner of the office."For technology, it's more of a brain activity. Workers need time to find inspiration," Dai said. "Our rest area isn't just for sleeping at night, the midday is also OK."Office workers sleeping on the job has long been a common sight in China, where inefficiency and a surplus of cheap labor can give workers plenty of downtime in many industries. But China's technology sector is different. Business is booming faster than many start-up firms can hire new staff, forcing workers to burn the midnight oil to meet deadlines."The pace of Chinese internet company growth is extremely fast. I've been to the U.S. and the competitive environment there isn't as intense as in China," said Cui Meng, general manager and co-founder of start-up data company Goopal. The company's programmers, in particular, work overtime every day, he said. To get them through, they are allowed to sleep around lunchtime and after 9 p.m., either facedown at their desk or by commandeering the sofa or a beanbag chair.LIVING AT THE OFFICEAt its most extreme, some tech company employees even live at the office during the work week. Liu Zhanyu at DouMiYouPin, a recruitment and human resources platform, bunks down in a converted conference room Monday-to-Friday to avoid the daily commute of more than an hour to his home in Beijing's far eastern suburbs.The head of the "large clients" department usually retires to the room shared with one or two others between midnight and 3 a.m."We have to get up at 8:30 a.m. because all our co-workers come to work at 9:30 and we wash in the same bathroom everyone uses," said Liu.While workers across companies said the potential pay-off of working at a start-up was worth the long hours, they aren't without a social cost. "My kid misses me, I get home and he lunges at me like a small wolf," Liu said, speaking about his three-year-old son who he only sees on weekends. "That makes me feel a bit guilty."Programmer Xiang Shiyang, 28, works until 3 or 4 a.m. at least twice a week at Renren Credit Management, which uses big data to help firms manage financial risk, leaving little room to socialize outside of work."I don't have that many opportunities or much time to find a girlfriend," he said.The company provides cots for workers like Xiang to sleep on during late nights."Actually working overtime is a very casual thing," he said. "Because I've invested the whole of my being into this company." (Writing by Jake Spring; Editing by Alex Richardson)

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UK prosecutors to weigh up sex crimes allegations against Cliff Richard

LONDON Prosecutors said they would consider whether singer Cliff Richard, one of Britain's best-known entertainers, should face charges over alleged historical sex crimes after being handed a file of evidence by police on Tuesday.Richard, 75, has twice voluntarily met officers from South Yorkshire Police after it launched an inquiry in 2014 into allegations against him that date back to the 1980s and involve an under-age boy. The singer has never been arrested and has always said the allegations against him are false.The Crown Prosecution Service said it had received a "full file of evidence" from the police."We will now carefully consider its contents ... in order to establish whether there is sufficient evidence to provide a realistic prospect of conviction, and whether it is in the public interest to do so," it added in a statement. Richard was first interviewed by detectives after police raided his home in August last year when he was on holiday. The search was filmed by the BBC after the broadcaster was given advance warning.That raid led to criticism from lawmakers who described the co-operation between the police and the BBC as "inept" and causing "irreparable damage" to the singer's reputation. Richard, born Harry Webb in 1940 and who was called Britain's Elvis Presley early in his career, has had 14 No. 1 singles in Britain. He is the only singer to have topped the UK singles chart in five consecutive decades, from the 50s to the 90s, and was knighted by Queen Elizabeth in 1995. With his backing group The Shadows, Richard was one of Britain's most successful performers in the pre-Beatles era of the late 1950s and early 1960s. His early hits include "Summer Holiday" and "Living Doll." (Reporting by Michael Holden; editing by Stephen Addison)

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Apple wins dismissal of lawsuit over MacBook logic boards

Apple Inc won the dismissal on Thursday of a lawsuit accusing it of defrauding consumers by selling MacBook laptop computers that contained "logic boards" it knew were defective, and which routinely failed within two years.U.S. District Judge William Alsup in San Francisco said the plaintiffs, Uriel Marcus and Benedict Verceles, failed to show that Apple made "affirmative misrepresentations," despite citing online complaints and Apple marketing statements calling the laptops "state of the art" or the "most advanced" on the market."Plaintiffs have failed to allege that Apple's logic boards were unfit for their ordinary purposes or lacked a minimal level of quality," Alsup wrote. "Both plaintiffs were able to adequately use their computers for approximately 18 months and two years, respectively."Alsup gave the plaintiffs until Jan. 22 to amend their lawsuit, which sought class-action status, against the Cupertino, California-based company. Omar Rosales, a lawyer for the plaintiffs, did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Apple did not immediately respond to a similar request.The plaintiffs claimed that Apple's sale of MacBooks since May 20, 2010, violated consumer protection laws in California and Texas, where the lawsuit began last May before being moved.They also contended that Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook was told about the defective logic boards in 2011, but did nothing. Logic boards contain computer circuitry and are sometimes known as motherboards.A separate and still pending lawsuit in California accuses Apple of defrauding consumers by selling MacBook Pro laptops in 2011 that contained defective graphic cards, causing screen distortions and system failures. MacBooks are part of Apple's Mac line of desktop and laptop computers. The company reported unit sales in that business of 18.91 million in its latest fiscal year.The case is Marcus et al v. Apple Inc, U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, No. 14-03824. (Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York. Editing by Andre Grenon)

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